Reno High family legacies lives on

Former Reno High cheerleaders now have children of their own at the school.

Former Reno High cheerleaders now have children of their own at the school.

Bliss Quilici Quain

Reno High is known for being one of the oldest schools in Reno. Over time, many generations
have graduated from RHS. It’s a school of history and traditions that have been carried on. Many Reno
High alumni are now sending their children here and are continually turning it into one big community;
it is a school of respect honor and strength.
Freshman Marissa Peterson and Junior Bella Peterson’s dad graduated from Reno High in 1991.
“We chose RHS because we were zoned for it, and it also has the Red House Program that we
found interest in,” Alumni Deven Peterson said. “I also wanted them to go there because I went there.”
For the Peterson’s, the community here created friendships that lasted way past graduating high
school.
“My dad has made lifelong friends with some of the people he went to school with,” Marissa
Peterson said. “We consider some of them aunts and uncles.”
The close-knit society of Reno creates a strong and family- like community. Since so many
generations have graduated from here, many of the traditions have been passed down as well.
“The school assemblies, Friday night football games, even getting Godfather’s Pizza at lunch,”
Deven Peterson said. “I’ve noticed they have the same yellow tile in the hallway, and the same lockers.”
School spirit and sports is what helps creates a community. Having football games on Friday
nights, and students going to support and sometimes dressing up. It’s a part of the whole high school
experience.

“I would imagine my dad hanging out with the jocks,” Freshman Ella Robnett said, “and I could
see my mom hanging out with a smaller closer group of people, because she never liked drama.”
High school experiences are different for everyone, depending on the person and the school.
“My experience at RHS was fairly normal, my freshman and sophomore year,” Alumni Jessica
Robnett said. “I was young, so I didn’t get to drive until my junior year, we would go follow the Grateful
Dead on the weekend, it was wild.”
This school year has been different with the hybrid model. It has been proven to be harder for
some and easier for others. Everyone is doing things differently, and with half of the school being online
it makes it hard to connect and be a part of the school.
“I am happy with Reno High because I love the teachers,” Alumni Lucretia Lueamrung said. “I
am just not happy with the way the teachers are teaching with the hybrid model.”